Category: Solar Energy

Wind and solar energy are the lowest cost options in most of the U.S., and that’ll make it very hard to stop the renewable energy freight train from running over fossil fuels.

Utilities that need to build new power generation facilities or replace old ones are going to have a hard time justifying anything but renewable energy in 2017 and beyond. Investment bank Lazard recently released its 11th analysis of the cost of new electricity generation, titled Lazard’s Levelized Cost Of Energy Analysis–Version 11.0, and showed that wind and solar energy are now cheaper than diesel, nuclear, coal, and in most cases natural gas.

Utilities and regulators are going to be hard-pressed to justify anything but renewable energy generation in the future. From Maine to Hawaii, the U.S.’s energy future is renewable.

Solar farm with wind turbines in the background. IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

How renewable energy costs stack up today

The table below shows Lazard’s analysis of the cost, on a per kWh basis, to build new power plants with different fuel sources and technologies. You can see that the lowest cost option is wind at 3 cents per kWh, followed by gas combined cycle that’s as cheap as 4.2 cents per kWh, and solar, which costs between 4.3 cents and 5.3 cents per kWh.

Energy source Low-End Estimate High-End Estimate
Crystalline Utility-Scale Solar PV 4.6 cents per kWh 5.3 cents per kWh
Thin-Film Utility-Scale Solar PV 4.3 cents per kWh 4.8 cents per kWh
Wind 3 cents per kWh 6 cents per kWh
Coal 6 cents per kWh 14.3 cents per kWh
Natural Gas Combined Cycle 4.2 cents per kWh 7.8 cents per kWh
Nuclear 12.2 cents per kWh 18.3 cents per kWh
Diesel 19.7 cents per kWh 28.1 cents per kWh
DATA SOURCE: LAZARD’S LEVELIZED COST OF ENERGY ANALYSIS–VERSION 11.0.

What you’ll also notice is that the range of costs is much wider for fossil fuels like natural gas. That’s because construction costs can be different depending on the state, fuel prices, and how often the plant is being used. Renewable energy, on the other hand, gets to cut to the front of the line on the grid, meaning nearly 100% of its electricity production is used, allowing for predictable electricity pricing.

What’s clear is that diesel, nuclear, and coal are all higher cost than both wind and solar energy on a per kWh basis. No matter how you slice it, renewable energy is winning versus fossil fuels on economics.

I’ll also point out that there’s no fuel cost risk for renewable energy. The wind and sun are zero-cost fuel sources, unlike extracted fuels, which could conceivably spike from current levels.

Trends are working against fossil fuels

It wasn’t long ago that Lazard’s analysis wasn’t so favorable to renewable energy. In 2010, version 4.0 of Lazard’s levelized cost of energy study had wind costs at 6.5-11.0 cents per kWh and solar at 13.4-19.4 cents per kWh. Natural gas, coal, and nuclear all beat solar on a cost basis, and in some cases beat wind.

Energy source Low-End Estimate High-End Estimate
Crystalline Utility-Scale Solar PV 13.4 cents per kWh 15.4 cents per kWh
Thin-Film Utility-Scale Solar PV 13.4 cents per kWh 18.8 cents per kWh
Wind 6.5 cents per kWh 11.0 cents per kWh
Coal 6.9 cents per kWh 15.2 cents per kWh
Natural Gas Combined Cycle 6.7 cents per kWh 9.6 cents per kWh
Nuclear 7.7 cents per kWh 11.4 cents per kWh
DATA SOURCE: LAZARD’S LEVELIZED COST OF ENERGY ANALYSIS–VERSION 4.0.

Clearly, the tides have shifted in the energy industry. Fossil fuels is at best flat and in some cases getting more expensive, while renewable energy costs are coming down every year. There’s no indication these trends will reverse course, and investors need to consider whether they’re using renewable energy’s growth as a tailwind for their portfolio or fighting the clear trends in energy. If these charts are any indication, fossil fuels’ days may be numbered.

The Public Service Company of New Mexico is asking for project proposals, including renewables and battery storage, designed to help reach its coal-free goal by 2031.

It’s an ambitious, audacious goal.

In its 20-year 2017 Integrated Resource Plan submitted to the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (NMPRC)earlier this year, Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) announced its intentions to be coal-free by 2031. Now it’s taken the first steps toward reaching those goals.

Last week, the state’s largest utility issued a request for proposals (RFP) for 456 MW of new generation resources, including renewable resources and battery storage. The RFP is predicated on the assumption that the utility’s San Juan Generating Station does not continue to operate post 2022.

The inclusion of battery storage in the RFP is part of a new NMPRC mandate that all the state’s utilities include those options in their future plans. The mandate was implemented in August.

In its August decision, the NMPRC said the original 2008 regulation that mandated IRPs didn’t take storage into account because the technology wasn’t sophisticated enough, and what did exist was too expensive. Now the technology is more easily deployable, adding them to the list of requirements makes far more sense – and PNM has taken the commission’s requirements into consideration with its new RFP.

But with new technologies available and prices coming down, the NMPRC decided the time was right to add it to the data requirements included in the reports.

PNM wants proposals that will help its portion of the grid provide the necessary reliability requirements and minimum operating resources that will meet North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) criteria.

PV Magazine 

A joint study by Finland’s Lappeenranta University of Technology and Energy Watch Group presented on the sidelines of the COP23 talks in Bonn demonstrates that a global transition to 100% renewable electricity could be achieved by 2050, and would be more cost effective than the current electricity system.

Longi Solar

The study, ‘Global Energy System Based on 100% Renewable Energy – Power Sector’ was presented during the Global Renewable Energy Solutions Showcase event, a sideline to the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP23 currently underway in Bonn.

The study’s key overall finding is that a global shift to 100% renewable electricity is feasible with current technology, and would be more cost effective than the current system led by fossil fuels and nuclear generation.

The study found that in a projected scenario for energy demand in 2050, 100% could be met by current renewable technologies, at a global average LCOE of €52/MWh, compared with 2015’s average LCOE of €70.

In EWG’s 2050 scenario, solar PV covers 69% of electricity demand, wind 18%, hydro 8% and bioenergy 2%. The study predicts that wind will briefly overtake solar in the 2020s, before further price drops put solar back in the lead.

Storage is outlined as the key supporting technology for solar, with around 31% of total demand covered by storage technologies. 95% of this is projected to come from short term storage provided by batteries, with power to gas conversion providing seasonal storage.

“There is no reason to invest one more dollar in fossil or nuclear power production,” exclaims EWG President Hans Josef. “All plans for a further expansion of coal, nuclear, gas and oil have to be ceased. More investments need to be channeled in renewable energies and the necessary infrastructure for storage and grids. Everything else will lead to unnecessary costs and increasing global warming.”

The report is based on an original model developed by Lappeenranta University of Technology, which calculates the most cost-effective mix of technologies based on available resources in 145 regions for a full reference year. The full study is published here.

Only time will tell whether this study’s recommendation will translate into reality. As lead author Christian Breyer sums up: “Energy transition is no longer a question of technical feasibility or economic viability, but of political will.”

PV Magazine

Prime Minister Andrew Holness says Jamaica must capitalise on the availability of renewable energy. He explained that the country would be in a far better position if it could convert naturally occurring forces into energy.

“It is possible for Jamaica to go to approximately 50 per cent of its energy needs provided by alternatives,” Holness declared during a tour of BMR Jamaica Wind Limited in Potsdam, St Elizabeth, on Wednesday.

BMR Jamaica Wind Limited is the builder, owner and operator of Jamaica’s largest privately funded renewable energy project. The 36.3MW wind-generating facility has been in operation since July 1, 2016. At a cost of US$89.9 million, this represents a major investment in the parish of St Elizabeth.

LOCAL ENERGY A PREFERENCE

“From a policy perspective, we would much prefer to have more of our energy locally generated, and from that perspective, renewables are very important to us,” said Holness.

He pointed out that there is great potential between the parishes of Manchester and St Elizabeth for an expansion in wind-generating plants and that the significant investment made by BMR Limited is an indication that there can be even greater investment in wind energy in Jamaica.

Meanwhile, the Prime Minister said that the Government is doing an integrated resource plan which will project what are the country’s future needs. In addition, the plan will incorporate how the country can supply those future needs integrating renewables, in particular wind and solar.

PROBLEM WITH SUPPLY

“Of course, the problem with renewables is the intermittency of the supply, and even that can be overcome with battery technology, which has increased and improved, and so I hold a very optimistic view of the future of energy supply in Jamaica. We are now looking at expansion in solar,” added the Prime Minister.

According to Holness, another solar plant will be opened very soon and the Government is also examining waste energy as a solution.

The BMR Jamaica Wind project holds the distinction of being the first project funded in Jamaica by the Overseas Private Investment Company (OPIC). US$62.7 million was provided by OPIC and US$20 million from the International Finance Company (IFC).

The project is the recipient of the OPIC impact award 2016, as well as, the CREF Wind Project of the Year 2017.

Gleaner

UN CLIMATE CHANGE PRESS RELEASE / 10 NOV, 2017

A federal trade panel is recommending that Trump impose tariffs as high as 35 percent on solar power technology.

Hurricanes Irma and Maria are still fresh in the mind of all of us who experienced them in the British Virgin Islands and wider Caribbean. These hurricanes have affected so many people, and everyone will have their own heart-breaking, moving and inspiring story to tell. I wanted to highlight a few, and share what I’ve been up to as well.


In the wake of the hurricanes, Virgin Unite has been working with Team Rubicon to bring practical, immediate and vital help to affected communities across the BVI. Lizzy Stileman, a member of Team Rubicon, shares her views about the impact of the hurricanes, and what needs to happen now. Meanwhile, John Ratliff – a long-time friend of Virgin Unite and member of our advisory council for the Virgin Unite Community – shares his story about flying out to the BVI to help on the ground. Below I’ve also shared Sam’s moving film, Help Hope Hurricanes, sharing his view from Virgin Gorda in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

Meanwhile, I have been continuing to rally aid and support for the BVI as we continue the recovery process. I recently met with more than 50 representatives of Caribbean governments and utility companies at the Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum in Miami. It was hosted by BMR Energy, one of Virgin Group’s investments, and gave us all a platform to discuss plans to expand the use of renewable energy in the region.

We highlighted the importance of renewable energy – solar, wind, geothermal and others – to reduce costs, reduce the harm being done to the environment and increase the resilience of their electric systems to withstand future hurricanes. In the aftermath of Irma and Maria, this message resonated more than ever.

It was inspiring to see so many decision makers and stakeholders gathered together, committed to tackling climate action now, and putting clean energy as the centerpiece of rebuilding efforts in the Caribbean. There has never been a more important time to push for this type of infrastructure.

Before returning to the BVI, I also travelled to Puerto Rico to meet with governor Ricardo Rosselló. I wanted to meet in person to share my heartfelt thanks for the incredible support Puerto Rico gave to the BVI during Hurricane Irma. We also discussed plans to power Puerto Rico with more clean energy, and the Rocky Mountain Institute plans to complete a study on the most effective ways to do this. It was a really positive visit, testament to the amazing people in Puerto Rico, in such a testing time.

Back in the BVI, I would echo Lizzy’s words: “There is still so much work to do here and there are so many people suffering. It will take years to recover, but it will recover.”

To help further support the affected communities please donate to the BVI Community Support Appeal and help us build a better, cleaner, stronger and more sustainable Caribbean region.

Virgin

During remarks delivered to a climate change conference at Yale University, Academy-Award-winning actor and activist Leonardo DiCaprio announced his foundation’s largest-ever portfolio of environmental grants, which includes $120,000 for U.S.-based solar nonprofit RE-volv.

At the Tuesday event, hosted by former Secretary of State John Kerry’s Kerry Initiative, DiCaprio announced that the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation (LDF) awarded $20 million in new grants to more than 100 organizations. According to an LDF press release, the grants have been awarded to help wildlife and habitat conservation, to aid in the defense of indigenous rights, and to support innovative grass-roots efforts aimed at combating climate change and solving complex environmental issues.

During his address at the conference, DiCaprio – LDF founder and chairman and a U.N. Messenger of Peace for Climate Change – said, “We are proud to support the work of over 100 organizations at home and abroad. These grantees are active on the ground, protecting our oceans, forests and endangered species for future generations – and tackling the urgent, existential challenges of climate change.”

DiCaprio went on to push for urgent action to drive a large-scale, global shift from a reliance on fossil fuels to a world powered by renewable energy, saying, “There exist today many proven technologies in renewable energy, clean transportation, and sustainable agriculture, that we can begin to build a brighter future for all of us.”

As part of its major new round of grants, LDF will provide a $120,000 award to the solar nonprofit RE-volv in an effort to expand access to affordable solar energy for nonprofit organizations around the U.S. In a separate press release, RE-volv says the partnership will provide match funding for RE-volv’s unique crowdfunding platform, allowing donors the opportunity to double their contributions with the support of DiCaprio’s foundation.

This is the largest grant to date for RE-volv, a two-time awardee of the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative. RE-volv supports solar energy projects for nonprofits that lack access to financing options. According to the group, an estimated 1.5 million nonprofits in the U.S. face financial barriers to obtaining solar power, as they do not qualify for solar tax credits or are too small to attract traditional investors. RE-volv works to help bridge this funding gap for organizations that provide valuable public services to vulnerable communities, including homeless shelters, schools, community centers, and houses of worship.

“RE-volv is working to make sure that the benefits of solar can reach everyone, including nonprofit organizations and the people they serve,” says Andreas Karelas, executive director of RE-volv. “Thanks to this generous grant from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, RE-volv will be able to scale its impact and bring solar to even more nonprofits around the country.”

As the group explains, RE-volv’s crowdfunding platform employs a revolving fund. Donors select a specific nonprofit to support, and as the project pays back dividends through a solar lease agreement, the user can then reinvest in new solar projects through the RE-volv platform. RE-volv says this pay-it-forward model helps to accelerate solar energy deployment in local communities while keeping donors engaged in solar projects.

“The Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation is excited to support RE-volv,” says Gregory Lopez, LDF’s Climate Program Director. “Not only is their work important in deploying solar energy and reducing greenhouse gasses, [but also] their unique model provides an introduction of accessible, renewable energy to new communities.”

To date, RE-volv says it has raised over $300,000 from over 1,000 people in 22 countries. It has crowdfunded 10 solar projects (150 kW of capacity) in four states, include Harbor House in Oakland, which serves refugee, immigrant, and low-income families with after-school programs and ESL classes; and Morris Chapel Baptist Church, the oldest African American Church in Philadelphia. Thanks to the solar projects, grantees are expected to save between 15% and 40% on their electric bills. In total, these 10 nonprofits will save more than $1.5 million over the life of their solar energy systems. RE-volv says its solar revolving fund, the Solar Seed Fund, is now worth $650,000 in future lease payments from these 10 projects – payments which will be used to finance at least 20 more solar energy projects.

In addition to financing projects, RE-volv trains college students and community volunteers to become Solar Ambassadors, who in turn lead the on-the-ground efforts to deploy solar. RE-volv claims it has also educated 10,000 people about solar energy through training, outreach, and more than 100 events.

Among many other LDF-highlighted grantees are the Solutions Project, whose Fighter Fund and Leadership Fund provide direct grants to community organizations across the U.S. that are fighting for 100% renewable energy, and SunFunder, whose Beyond the Grid Solar Fund vehicle provides affordable access to solar in developing countries in Africa and South Asia. More information on LDF’s $20 million round of new grants is available here.

Solar Industry

Despite a strong opposition campaign, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) handed co-petitioners Suniva and SolarWorld Americas a victory in their controversial Section 201 trade case on Friday.

All four designated commissioners voted affirmatively that crystalline silicon photovoltaic (CSPV) cells and modules have been imported into the U.S. in such quantities that it caused, or threatened to cause, serious injury to the domestic CSPV manufacturing industry. The unanimous decision moves the ITC’s global safeguard investigation from the injury phase to the remedy phase, and the commission will ultimately make a remedy recommendation to President Donald Trump. If the ITC had voted against the petition, the case would have ended. Now, Trump will have the final say.

Suniva declares it is “gratified” by the ITC’s vote. “We brought this action because the U.S. solar manufacturing industry finds itself at the precipice of extinction at the hands of foreign market overcapacity,” the company says in a statement. “The ITC has agreed, and now it will be in President Trump’s hands to decide whether America will continue to have the capability to manufacture this energy source. President Trump can remedy this injury with relief that ensures U.S. energy dominance that includes a healthy U.S. solar ecosystem and prevents China and its proxies from owning the sun.”

In a separate release, Juergen Stein, CEO and president of SolarWorld Americas, says, “On behalf of the entire solar cell and panel manufacturing industry, we welcome this important step toward securing relief from a surge of imports that has idled and shuttered dozens of factories, leaving thousands of workers without jobs.”

Meanwhile, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), which led a massive campaign against the case, denounces the decision.

“The ITC’s decision is disappointing for nearly 9,000 U.S. solar companies and the 260,000 Americans they employ,” says Abigail Ross Hopper, president and CEO of SEIA, in a release. “Foreign-owned companies that brought business failures on themselves are attempting to exploit American trade laws to gain a bailout for their bad investments. Analysts say Suniva’s remedy proposal will double the price of solar, destroy two-thirds of demand, erode billions of dollars in investment and unnecessarily force 88,000 Americans to lose their jobs in 2018.”

The Energy Trade Action Coalition (ETAC), a group of companies, associations and organizations that joined together in July to oppose the trade petition, has also spoken out against the ruling.

ETAC Spokesperson Paul Nathanson says, “Utilities, power co-ops, retailers, manufacturers and other large commercial users, along with conservative groups who have criticized federal solar subsidies, all agree that unwarranted tariffs would cause severe damage to the solar industry while setting a terrible precedent for future trade cases.”

The ITC officially launched its probe in May after Georgia-based bankrupt manufacturer Suniva filed a Section 201 petition, and facing troubles of its own, Oregon-based SolarWorld Americas later joined as a co-petitioner. The two companies have argued that Chinese-owned suppliers set up shop in other markets to successfully avoid U.S. tariffs and that a continued glut of cheap imports into the U.S. makes it difficult for domestic manufacturers to compete. (Notably, SolarWorld has a German parent and Suniva is majority owned by a Chinese company, which itself opposed the Section 201 petition.)

The obscure Section 201 mechanism is unlike the previous SolarWorld-led U.S. trade actions against Chinese and Taiwanese solar imports. As the ITC explains in a fact sheet, “Global safeguard investigations do not require a finding of an unfair trade practice such as under the U.S. countervailing duty law (a foreign subsidy) or the antidumping duty law.”

Furthermore, the investigations “are not country specific,” meaning any new import tariffs or other remedy would be implemented on a global scale, rather than focus on CSPV products from a particular country. However, the fact sheet says the commissioners were “required to make additional separate findings for certain countries with which the U.S. has free-trade agreements.”

In fact, an ITC press release indicates that, of those free-trade agreement partners, the commission did not find injury on Friday with respect to CSPV imports from Canada and Singapore, as well as from Australia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Jordan, Panama and Peru. The commission did, however, make affirmative injury determinations for free-trade partners Mexico and Korea.

The ITC decision follows an hours-long hearing in August during which the co-petitioners, SEIA and other stakeholders testified. SEIA has rallied solar companies, legislators and other stakeholders against the petition ever since Suniva initiated the case, but in the lead-up to Friday’s vote, SolarWorld and Suniva garnered public support from a number of groups. In a recent analysis, the co-petitioners claimed the proposed trade actions would lead to at least 114,800 new jobs across all solar industry segments – a finding that contradicts an earlier SEIA analysis claiming that 88,000 U.S. solar jobs would be lost next year if the ITC imposes the trade protections.

In a statement, Andrea Luecke, president and executive director of The Solar Foundation, says, “This decision brings yet more uncertainty to an industry that has created real value for the United States.”

“Our National Solar Jobs Census finds the dramatic growth in U.S. solar employment over the past several years was driven by the sharply reduced cost of installations,” she states. “Any new tariffs are likely to increase costs and reduce demand for installations, disrupting the solar jobs market that now employs 260,000 workers in the United States and is valued in the tens of billions of dollars. The next update to our Solar Jobs Census will include more information and analysis on how this decision will impact American solar jobs.”

Next Steps

As mentioned, the ITC will now move forward to the remedy phase, which will include more stakeholder input and another hearing on Oct. 3. The commission will make its recommendation to Trump on Nov. 13, and the president will then have about two months to decide whether to adopt that recommendation or another remedy – if one at all.

However, it should be noted that Trump and his team have previously singled out Section 201 as a potential remedy for other trade issues and the president reportedly reiterated a call for tariffs recently.

In its petition, Suniva proposed an initial import tariff of $0.40/W per CSPV cell and a minimum import price of $0.78/W per CSPV module (which is inclusive of the $0.40/W cell tariff). Several analysts have said that would essentially double the current price of solar modules and make those imported into the U.S. the most expensive in the world.

Although SolarWorld did not propose its own remedy after joining the petition, Tim Brightbill, the company’s trade counsel and partner at Wiley Rein LLP in Washington, D.C., recently verified during an interview at the Solar Power International trade show, “We support Suniva’s remedy proposal.”

Nonetheless, SolarWorld’s Stein says in his Friday statement, “In the remedy phase of the process, we will strive to help fashion a remedy that will put the U.S. industry as a whole back on a growth path. We will continue to invite the Solar Energy Industries Association and our industry partners to work on good solutions for the entire industry. It is time for the industry to come together to strengthen American solar manufacturing for the long term.”

SEIA’s Hopper says, “While we continue to believe that this is the wrong decision, based on Suniva and SolarWorld’s mismanagement, we respect the commission’s vote and we will continue to lead the effort to protect the solar industry from damaging trade relief. We expect to be front and center in the ITC remedy process and in the administration’s consideration of this deeply flawed case.

“As the remedy phase moves forward, I am determined to reach a conclusion that will protect the solar industry, our workers and the American public from what amounts to a shakedown by these two companies,” she continues. “An improper remedy will devastate the burgeoning American solar economy and ultimately harm America’s manufacturers and 36,000 people currently engaged in solar manufacturing that don’t make cells and panels.”

ETAC’s Nathanson adds, “ETAC will continue to fight vigorously during the remedy phase, encouraging administration officials and members of Congress to help ensure that no remedies are imposed that would threaten the solar industry’s ability to compete with other energy sources.”

In an emailed statement, Tony Clifford, chief development officer of Maryland-based solar provider Standard Solar, says, “Anyone closely involved with watching how this trade petition wended its way through the U.S. International Trade Commission process always had a sneaking suspicion the final decision would end up with President Donald J. Trump. The ITC did its due diligence and, after much deliberation, decided these two foreign-owned module makers were indeed harmed by module imports from other countries – but fortunately, today’s decision is only the beginning, not the ending, of the story.”

Clifford adds, “Now the ITC begins its deliberations about what remedies should be imposed on imports, and this will be where the real effects on the industry will be determined. I hope the ITC will conclude only minimal or no tariff increases are necessary. Otherwise, the U.S. solar industry could lose 88,000 or more jobs. I’d also remind President Trump that two-thirds of the solar jobs in America do not require any college education. Losing 88,000 jobs, most of which are blue collar, is a lot for the American economy – and President Trump’s base in particular – to absorb.”

An Associated Press report cites White House spokesperson Natalie Strom as saying Trump “will examine the facts and make a determination that reflects the best interests of the United States. The U.S. solar manufacturing sector contributes to our energy security and economic prosperity.”

Morten A. Lund, a partner at Stoel Rives and chair of the law firm’s Solar Energy Initiative, says, “The president will have significant discretion in whether to move forward with any remedy recommended by the United States International Trade Commission, including the discretion to modify the recommended remedy. He will probably decide with advice from the United States Trade Representative and advisors.

“With a 4-0 vote, it seems likely that the president will impose a remedy or risk backlash from ignoring a unanimous vote of injury from the USITC, the country’s trade watchdog,” Lund continues. “The remedy hearing and process will tell us a lot about how much the commission will consider the impact on the greater solar industry or energy sector in fashioning a remedy. The president has shown a strong protectionist leaning in trade matters, particularly with regard to China, and is known to favor tariffs generally. That would tend to support an expectation that he will implement a remedy.”

According to the ITC fact sheet, a Section 201 remedy is “temporary,” and “the initial period of relief cannot be longer than four years.” The fact sheet adds, “If extended, the effective period of relief cannot exceed eight years in the aggregate.”

Solar Industry

From rolling back plastic bottle bans in national parks to dismantling the U.S. climate change advisory board, the Trump administration continues its assault on the environment. We must work together to help ensure a brighter future for our generation and generations to come. Never forget that every individual action matters, no matter how small.

Below is a collection of actions you can take right now to help combat the climate crisis. We also urge you to invite your friends to join the “Fight the Flood” action center where they can sign up themselves and explore more ways to make a difference.

Action 1: Pledge to reduce your household energy waste this year 
Energy is wasted at almost every point of its generation, transmission and use — from extracting fossil fuels to using inefficient appliances. All this wasted energy takes a toll on our climate, water and wildlife. Fortunately there are many ways to reduce energy waste, both by making shifts in your lifestyle and by pressuring your legislators to create better energy policy. Pledge to fight energy waste and make a difference on climate change.

Action 2: Tell President Trump: Appalachian communities are at risk
Mountaintop removal coal mining has destroyed more than 500 mountains and buried more than 2,000 miles of streams in Appalachia. Yet, despite a growing movement of Appalachians and more than 100,000 concerned Americans rallying to end the destruction, it’s still happening. Add your voice to the movement demanding the Trump administration takes action to stop mountaintop removal.

Action 3: Unmask your city to help combat air pollution
Air pollution presents serious risks to public health. More than 80% of people living in urban areas where air quality is monitored are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) safety limits, increasing the risk of heart disease, lung cancer, respiratory diseases and stroke. Today health practitioners are coming together to raise the importance of safe, clean air for their patients and for the climate. Find your city here and contact your representatives to get involved.

Be a climate warrior!